Wednesday, June 19, 2013

AUTOS FROM THE ARCHIVES: MIKE SCOTT


THE SPLITTER SAVED HIS CAREER.





29-44/4.45 BEFORE LEARNING SPLIT; 95-64/3.11 AFTERWARD.

THE CARD

  • Similar to the Mike Scott photo used on the original, this is a sharp 1987 reproduction, and who doesn't love that retro Astros logo?

THE AUTOGRAPH

  • A little sloppy but looks like a natural element of the card, picking up the blue from the nameplate.

THE PLAYER

  • In 1987, Scott had the world at his finger tips. Actually, his split-finger tips. 
  • Riding that devastating pitch to 306 strikeouts and the NL Cy Young Award the year before, Scott won 16 more games in '87 and was the NL starter in the All-Star Game. 
  • Many -- especially the '86 Mets -- would say there was nothing magical about Scott's go-to pitch that a little sandpaper couldn't have produced.
  • Scott basically was washed up after the '84 season at age 29 after winning five games. He sought out famed pitching coach Roger Craig, who taught him the split-finger.
  • Voila! In '85, he used that pitch to win 18 games. A year later, he led the Astros to the West Division championship and nearly into the World Series after losing the classic six-game NLCS in '86. 
  • Already with two dominating complete-game wins against the Mets, he would've been the Game 7 starter had the Mets not won Game 6 in 16 innings.
  • Third all-time in Astros history in victories (110) and fourth in strikeouts (1,318).

THAT'S A WELL-WORN GLOVE.



LOOK AT ALL THOSE K's IN '86.

4 comments:

  1. Thank God the Mets won the '86 NLCS in six games, that's all I gotta say!

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  2. Seeing his pennant clinching no-hitter against the Giants in 1986 was one of my best ever experiences. I also VCR'd the game and still have the tape but no easy way to watch it.

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  3. Should've mentioned that no-hitter. Somehow, forgot about it. Thanks for sharing.

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  4. Funny thing about that game is that it cost the Astros wonderful play-by- play guy, Gene Elston his job. According to most accounts the owner at the time, John McMullen thought Elston's understated call wasn't enthusiastic enough and he was gone the next season in favor of Milo Hamilton as I recall. Elston is still missed.

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