Friday, July 5, 2013

1993 TOPPS FINEST: #41 GLENN DAVIS


FITTINGLY, HE LOOKS LIKE HE'S IN PAIN.




JUST WASN'T MEANT TO BE IN BALTIMORE.


DEFINING THE PLAYER

  • Three top-10 MVP finishes in five years had the Astros' Glenn Davis positioned among the National League's elite first basemen by the late 1980s. The Orioles, in need of an impact offensive player, were appropriately seduced. The stage was set for arguably the worst trade in franchise history. In January 1991, they sent #10 Curt Schilling, #9 Steve Finley and #62 Pete Harnisch to Houston for Davis. After nearly three seasons and numerous injuries, Davis was released. He hit a combined 24 homers and drove in 85 in 185 games. The other three? A combined nine All-Star appearances in 53 seasons.

DEFINING MOMENT

  • Seeing his first postseason action in Game 1 of the NLCS on Oct. 8, 1986, Davis slammed a solo homer to center off #113 Dwight Gooden in the bottom of the second, and ace Mike Scott made it stand up in the Astros' 1-0 victory.

DEFINING SEASON

  • Davis was runner-up to NL MVP Mike Schmidt in '86, belting 31 homers, driving in 101 and hitting .265. He won his first and only Silver Slugger and made his first NL All-Star team with 20 homers and 60 RBI at the break.

FIVE FINAL FACTS

  1. Born in Jacksonville, Fla., where he was practically reared by University Christian School Athletic Director George Davis (no relation), whose son Storm Davis could play a little ball, too. Glenn and Storm consider each other brothers.
  2. They were both drafted by the Orioles after graduating high school in '79, but only Storm signed; Glenn opted to play a season at the University of Georgia and then Manatee (Fla.) Junior College before signing with the Astros in '81.
  3. In '89, Davis became the first Astros to hit 20-plus homers in five consecutive seasons.
  4. A neck nerve injury suffered during his first spring training with the O's in '91 put him on a downward slide from which he'd never recover. He played in only 49 games and hit 10 homers.
  5. After hitting only 13 homers in 106 games in '92, Davis earned his release on Sept. 8, 1993, after getting into an argument with Manager Johnny Oates over not starting a game on Sept. 6. That capped a star-crossed season in which he missed time after getting his jaw busted in a bar fight and getting hit in the dugout by a line drive. The hits came from everywhere but his bat.

EXCITED TO GET DAVIS' AUTOGRAPH IN SPRING TRAINING '91.

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