Monday, January 6, 2014

1993 TOPPS FINEST: #91 BO JACKSON


A MAN OF EXTRAORDINARY SKILLS.



BO WASN'T THE SAME IN '93 BUT HE WAS BACK, HITTING 16 HRs.


DEFINING THE PLAYER

  • Bo Jackson redefined what was thought possible on the baseball diamond and football field. He is the only athlete who can call himself an All-Star and All-Pro, but his exploits during his eight-year foray into baseball might have been the most captivating. Raw numbers won't paint the picture: .250 average, 141 homers, 415 RBI, 82 steals. If you were lucky enough to watch Bo, you know he wasn't Nike hype; he was the real deal.

DEFINING MOMENT

  • On July 11, 1989, at Anaheim Stadium, Bo Inc. was unleashed. In the top half of the first inning, with two on and two out, he made a running catch to rob Pedro Guerrero. In the bottom half, Bo led off and crushed a Rick Reuschel pitch 448 feet to center. Then, right on cue, the "Bo Knows'' commercial debuts between innings:





  • Bo was named All-Star MVP, becoming only the second player after Willie Mays to homer and steal a base. Nike went on to sell a few pairs of Air Trainer SCs that summer. 

DEFINING SEASON

  • It's '89, when he hit 32 homers, drove in 105 runs and stole 26 bases. He also led baseball with 172 strikeouts.

FIVE FINAL FACTS

  1. Won the '85 Heisman Trophy for Auburn as a senior after rushing for 1,786 yards.
  2. Selected first overall in the '86 NFL Draft by the Bucs but opted to sign with the Royals, who took him in the fourth round of the amateur draft.
  3. Facing the Orioles' Jeff Ballard on July 29, 1989, Bo attempted to call timeout right before the ball was delivered but it was not granted. Bo quickly settled back in and drove the pitch to left for a home run. Even though Ballard threw tissue paper, that was pretty impressive.
  4. Once homered in four consecutive at-bats in '90, the first three coming before a stint on the DL. Then he took #154 Randy Johnson deep in his first post-DL at-bat.
  5. After Bo injured his hip during a Raiders' playoff game in '91, the Royals released him, and he missed the '92 season while having hip-replacement surgery. The White Sox signed him, and of course in his first at-bat on Opening Day on April 9, 1993, he homered off the Yankees' Neal Heaton
One more for you: 



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